Statistics

  • Rape is the most under-reported crime in the United States.1
  • Only 16 percent of rapes are ever reported to the police.2
  • One reported forcible rape (penetration of a female forcibly and against her will) or attempted rape takes place nearly every five minutes in the United States. This statistic does not included unreported rapes or other sexual assaults, including assaults against men or many children (boys, or girls sexually assaulted but not raped). 3
  • In 2001, there were 248,250 rapes and sexual assaults in the United States reported to law enforcement.4
  • Seventy-five percent of women raped are between the ages of 15 and 21. The average age is 18.5
  • The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS), conducted by the US Department of Justice, identified 333,000 incidences of rape and sexual assault in 1998. This includes unreported rapes (equaling three times the reported number).6
  • In 1997, 0.3% of women and 0.1% of men surveyed said they had experienced a completed or attempted rape in the previous 12 months. These estimates equate to approximately 302,100 women and 92,700 men who are forcibly raped each year in the United States.7
  • 80% of all sexual assaults are committed by an acquaintance of the victim.8
  • One in four sexual assaults takes place in the victim’s home, making it the most common place for an assault to take place. One in six takes place in or near a relative’s or friend’s home; one in five on the street; one in six in a parking garage or commercial building. Three out of five sexual assaults occur at night, with the largest proportion occurring between 6:00 pm and midnight.9
  • 10 to 14 percent of all married women and at least 40 percent of battered wives in the US have been raped by their husbands.10
  • The National Institute of Justice estimates that rape and other sexual assaults of adults cause an annual minimum loss of 127 billion dollars, or about $508 per U.S. resident. This includes tangible losses such as initial police response, medical care, mental health services, property damage or loss, and loss of productivity; and intangible losses, such as loss of quality of life, pain, and suffering. These costs do not include the costs of investigation, prosecution or incarceration of offenders. This figure makes sexual assault the costliest crime; even higher than murder.11
  • The cost of mental health care for the “typical” child sexual abuse victim is estimated to be $5,800.12
  • … violence against children accounts for a significant portion of our nationwide victim costs. Out-of-pocket costs for child victims are estimated to be more than 20 percent of all out- of-pocket crime victim costs and more than 35 percent of all costs (including pain, suffering, and lost quality of life).13

References
1 Federal Bureau of Investigations, Uniform Crime Report: 1990
2 National Victim Center and Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, Rape in America: A Report to the Nation: 1992
3 Federal Bureau of Investigations, Crime in the United States: 2001
4 U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics, Sourcebook of Criminal Justice Statistics: 2002
5 National Victim Center and Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, Rape in America: A Report to the Nation: 1992
6 U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics, Criminal Victimization in 1998: 1998
7 National Institute of Justice and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Prevalence, Incidence, and Consequences of Violence Against Women: Findings from the National Violence Against Women Survey: 1997
8 National Victim Center and Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center, Rape in America: A Report to the Nation: 1992
9 Crime and Crime Prevention Statistics
10 Campbell & Alford, “The Dark Consequences of Marital Rape,” American Journal of Nursing
11, 12, 13 US Department of Justice, Victim Costs and Consequences: A New Look: 1996